Best Scuba Diving in the Caribbean

Best Scuba Diving in the Caribbean

Lisa

Lisa Engels, Author

No scuba diver should miss out on the Caribbean. Every island postcard is an imitation of what it has. From white sand beaches to diverse marine life, these islands are calling for you.

So, if you’re interested in knowing our picks for the best scuba diving in the Caribbean, continue reading.

Best Scuba Diving in the Caribbean in 2021 and beyond

1. Bonaire

Some people love to dive from boats, while others prefer wall diving. Well, if you visit Bonaire, the shore diving capital of the world, prepare to spend your vacation doing some beginner-friendly diving from the shores.

Bonaire is one of the Caribbean Netherlands islands that boasts a warm, dry climate, which, along with its affordability, attracts seas of tourists and scuba divers each year.

It has more than 60 shore dive sites, which allows you to revisit your favorite spots again and again, and makes them accessible for beginners. The beautiful waters are calm and shallow, as well.

This Caribbean island is home to over 57 soft and hard coral species and over 350 recorded fish species. There’s a lot to enjoy underwater, from the large sponges and sea fans to plate corals.

Plus, you can snorkel among many marine friends, such as barracudas, seahorses, angelfish, shrimps, turtles, eels, and so much more. If you’re into macro photography, you’ll be pleased to find sea snails and nudibranchs.

The most famous dive site to check out is the 1,000 Steps Beach. Despite the name, it actually takes you only 64 steps from the road to the beach. This shore diving haven is famous for its star corals. You can also visit the Bari Reef, the Caribbean’s most diverse site for fish species.

2. Cayman Islands

Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac, and Little Cayman make up the Cayman Islands, which lie at the south of Cuba and northeast of Honduras. These Western Caribbean islands boast a tropical climate, wet and dry, that attracts around 2.1 million tourists each year. Thanks to having more than 159 dive sites, most of the tourists are divers.

Grand Cayman is popular among wreck divers who want a little taste of the past with an exciting twist.

The most famous shipwreck is the 251-foot USS Kittiwake, an American submarine rescue vessel that was sunk in 2011 in the Seven Mile Beach to become an artificial reef. It currently lies 80 feet under the water.

This artificial reef has attracted all kinds of marine life, such as garden eels, squirrelfish, urchins, eagle rays, and more. The second shipwreck to consider is the Wreck of the Cali, a freighter that sank in the 1940s.

Moreover, Little Cayman is known for its impressive biodiversity that you can enjoy, thanks to the record-setting visibility. The Bloody Bay Wall is a wall dive spot to die for. The coral reef stretches 1,000 feet under the water. It’s so vast and tranquil that you’ll feel like you died and went to heaven.

Prepare to see yellow sponges, emerald-green tube sponges, Nassau groupers, triggerfish, and so much more.

3. Bahamas

How can we talk about the Caribbean without mentioning the Bahamas? The Bahamas are an archipelago of more than 700 islands that stretch across 100,000 square miles in the Atlantic Ocean.

These islands are known for their sparkling clear waters, tropical climate, and abundant marine life. Understandably, around 7 million tourists visit the islands each year.

Scuba divers, in particular, go to the Bahamas to see some sharks up close. One of the most famous spots is Shark Rodeo in Walker’s Cay, where you can meet and feed up to 100 blacktip and Caribbean reef sharks.

Another popular spot is the Lost Blue Hole, an underwater sinkhole with incredibly diverse marine life. It’s abundant in macro life, such as seahorses, nudibranchs, and jawfish. Of course, you can enjoy the company of some marine beasts, such as black nose sharks.

Final Thoughts

We hope you liked our selection for the best scuba diving in the Caribbean. It has everything, from wreck and shore diving to shark watching. So, don’t miss out. Happy diving!