Where To Dive
Anguilla

Antigua

Aruba
Bahamas
Barbados
Bay Islands
Belize
Bonaire
BVI
Canary Islands
Cancun/Yucatan
Cayman Islands
Chuuk
Cook Islands
Costa Rica
Cozumel
Curacao
Dominica
Dominican Republic
East Timor
Egypt
Florida
Fiji
Galapagos Islands
Grenada
Guadeloupe
Hawaii
Hong Kong
Iceland
Indonesia
Israel
Jamaica
Jordan
Kiribati
Maldives
Martinique
Malaysia
Mexico
Montserrat
Mozambique
Nevis
Oman
Palau
Panama
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Saba
Saint Barthelemy
Saint Eustatius
Saint Kitts
Saint Lucia
Saint Maarten
Saint Vincent
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Tanzania
Thailand
Tobago
Turks & Caicos
USVI
Vietnam
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
     
     
 

Underwater Photography: Get Your Feet Wet!

Reprinted by permission of New York Institute of Photography

 
     
 



Photo By Jim Edds

"Today, underwater photography can be fun for everyone, thanks to the variety of equipment now available," explains Chuck DeLaney, Dean of the New York Institute of Photography, America's oldest and largest photography school. "You don't have to be Jacques Cousteau, and you don't need expensive gear. At the pool or beach, in surf or snorkeling, there are great waterproof point-and-shoot cameras and even single-use models that you can use to get the picture, provided you follow a few simple tips."

There's a lot of skill and equipment required for professional underwater photography, and many scuba training programs have good photography courses. But if you want to come home from where it's wet with some cool photos, here are some tips to get you started. The best time to take
underwater photos is usually mid-day because the sun is overhead and will illuminate underwater subjects clearly. Rookie underwater photographers are often susprised how quickly light and color get lost as you plunge just a few feet below the surface. Most waterproof point-and-shoot models have a built-in flash and you'll want to use your flash anytime you're more than a few feet under the water. Distance can be deceptive as well. Viewed through a face mask, objects appear closer to you than they really are. Make sure you get as close to your subject as possible before you take a photograph. Also, keep an eye out behind you. While you're maneuvering in toward that beautiful fish, you don't want a stinging jellyfish floating toward your backside.

Photo By C. Leedham

Waterproof cameras also work well for other wet and sandy occasions as well. In rainstorms you can take some very interesting photographs using a waterproof camera, and many smart photographers leave their expensive SLR at home when they go to the beach. Sand and salt water are two of the worst enemies of any camera, so using a sealed model makes a lot of sense and can help you avoid costly repairs.

For many more tips and articles orcontact your local dive center to find out more about underwater photography classes.
Reprinted with permission from the New York Institute of Photography
Visit your local dive center for information on underwater photography classes that may be offered. For more tips and articles on getting started in underwater photography, along with information about the latest gear for amateurs and professionals interested in underwater photography visit the NYIP Website at http://www.nyip.com. Everyone interested in photography can have fun in the water with the right gear. What are you waiting for?

 
     

 


 










Scuba Yellow Pages © 2015 | All Rights Reserved