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AMERICAN SAMOA

 
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About Samoa

Samoa may be readily located on a map of the Pacific Ocean by drawing a line from Hawaii to New Zealand, upon which it will be found about two thirds of the way down. The Samoan Islands lie spread out from east to west, overlapping the fourteenth degree of south latitude, at approximately 168 - 173 longitude west.

American Samoa's total land area is 76 square miles. Tutuila, the main island where Pago Pago Bay is located, has a land area of 54 square miles, with its highest peak, Mt. Matafao, rising 2,142 feet above the waters of Pago Pago Bay. The remaining 22 square miles include the three Manu'a Islands of Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u, which boast of the highest peak in the territory, Lata Mountain, at 3,050 feet. Other islands in American Samoa include Aunu'u, a satellite 1/4 mile off the eastern tip of Tutuila, Rose Atoll, a wild life refuge 65 miles east of Manu'a, and Swains Island, located 200 miles north of Pago Pago.

At the east most end of the Samoan archipelago lies the Manu'a Island group, a part of American Samoa. With a resident population of approximately 1,700, Manu'a today remains an undisturbed and strongly culture-oriented part of the Samoas.

The villages of Ofu, Olosega and Sili are located on the islands of Ofu and Olosega, or the twin-islands. The villages of Luma and Si'ufaga are located on the island of Ta'u.

The Island of Tutuila is the main island of the group with Pago Pago being the capital of the territory. The island is home to approximately 55,000 friendly polynesian inhabitants. Long known for its natural deep water harbor, Pago Pago is famous for its sheer forested volcanic mountains surrounding the deep blue and turquoise water that has been a shelter in a storm for many a sailing and fishing vessel.

Travel to Samoa

There are four airports - Tutuila, Ofu, Olosega, and Ta'u

The Pago Pago international airport is an international class airport with the capacity to accommodate any size commercial aircraft. Traffic control is maintained by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. It has two paved runways. The recently built, modern terminal complex houses several passenger service buildings, a comprehensive fire/crash station, shops, a restaurant and an extensive lounge and administrative area.

Polynesian Airline of Samoa

Daily scheduled flights between American Samoa and Western Samoa utilizing 19-seater Twin-Otter DHC-6 and 9-seater Britton-Norman Islander aircraft. Connect on to other pacific flights from Western Samoa to Hawaii, Los Angeles, Tonga, Fiji, and New Zealand on Polynesian's Boeing 737-800 aircraft.
P.O. Box 487
Pago Pago, American Samoa 96799
Reservations: (684) 699-9126
Administration: (684) 699-1704
Fax: (684) 699-2109

Fiji Airways

Flights between Nadi, Fiji and Apia.

Hawaiian Airlines

Direct twice weekly wide-body 230+ seat DC-10-10 service to/from American Samoa and Honolulu/U.S. Mainland.
Reservations: (684) 699-1875


Entry Requirements

Visas
Visitors do not require an entry permit if staying 30 days or less. Those intending to stay longer should apply for an entry permit at the Immigration Office prior to arrival.

Helpful Tips


Transportation
American Samoa has maintained its traditional quaint family owned bussing business. For 50 cents, you can ride an "aiga" bus from nearly anywhere on the island into Pago Pago, and connections to other parts of the island cost an additional 25 cents. The buses are painted in fun colors and each is its owner's pride and joy. Many have superb stereo systems and some even show videos during your ride into town. Not only a ride, but an experience to talk about!

Dining
Dining in Tutuila is a culinary experience. Local Barbeque and stone hearth baked local foods such as breadfruit, pork, chicken, and bananas are available in most villages, while more exotic tastes are catered to by many local restaurants. These include Korean, Chinese, American, Nouvelle Cuisine, Japanese, Polynesian, Italian to mention a few. The common factor in all of them is courteous, smiling service and delicious, fresh meals cooked to order.

Shopping
Shopping in American Samoa is always a pleasurable outing. With many small Korean, Samoan, and American stores carrying the latest in foods, furniture, electronics, hardware, toys and fresh local venue, American Samoa offers everything imaginable. With a huge warehouse sales store in Tafuna, even large families can stock up on those huge family sized containers of dog foods, paper products, cleaning supplies, and just about anything else needed around the house.

One hour photo processing, fashion clothing, handicrafts, cellular phones, printing services, and yes, even Samoan t-shirts can be found easily and reasonably priced in Pago Pago.

Electrical Appliances
Electricity runs at 110 volts.

Tipping
Tipping is not encouraged, but neither is it discouraged.

Clothing
Due to the modesty of this deeply religious nation, women are requested not to wear shorts in rural areas, and men should wear shirts. The local lavalava, which can be purchased anywhere, is comfortable and suitable. When at a beach near a village, women should not walk around in their swimming suits.

Time
With the International Dateline passing just to the west of Samoa, the sunset of each day is last seen in Samoa. It is 11 hours behind GMT and six hours behind New York. There is no summer time clock change.

Water
Water is treated, but it's advisable to check the source of all drinking water. If it isn't from the government system, boil it or use bottled water.

Health
Visitors are advised to have typhoid and hepatitis vaccinations and must be vaccinated against Yellow Fever if arriving within six days of leaving or transiting an infected area.

Visitors should take the usual precautions to avoid drinking untreated water. Give immediate attention to coral cuts and other skin problems and avoid sunburn.

Medical Facilities
Medical treatment is available on Tutuila at the LBJ Tropical Medical Center.

 
 

 


 










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